Prenatal diagnosis and perinatal outcome in congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Single tertiary center report

Vol. 55 No. 3 Suppl., 2014
This supplement was not sponsored by Outside Organizations.

ROMANIAN JOURNAL of MORPHOLOGY and EMBRYOLOGY

Stefania Tudorache, Luminita Cristina Chiutu, Dominic Gabriel Iliescu, Raluca Georgescu, George Alin Stoica, Cristiana Eugenia Simionescu, Eugen Florin Georgescu, Raducu Nicolae Nemes

Purpose: To evaluate the perinatal results for fetuses and neonates with left-sided congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) and the role of the prenatal diagnosis in the pregnancy outcome. Materials and Methods: We reviewed data from fetuses and neonates with left-sided CDH, managed from January 2009 and December 2013 in the University Clinic Hospital, Craiova, Romania. The following data were analyzed: the gestational age at the time of diagnosis, fetal karyotyping, presence of associated structural malformations, ultrasound (US) data (circumference and area of right lung, lung-to-head ratio - LHR, observed/expected LHR, hepatic herniation), the type of antenatal care, the pregnancy outcome, the place of birth and the conventional autopsy data, if performed. Perinatal outcomes were obtained by reviewing hospital documents. Results: Twenty-one cases were identified. No fetal surgery was performed in our series. Mean gestational age at time of diagnosis was 29 weeks of amenorrhea (WA) (range, 16-37 WA). Associated structural malformations were noticed in nine (42.8%) cases, in which three fetuses had a normal karyotype and two had chromosomal abnormalities, and four fetuses were not investigated. Isolated congenital diaphragmatic hernia was confirmed in 12 (57.1%) cases. All early second trimester diagnosed cases were terminated. The overall mortality rate was 61.9%. Rates of fetal deaths, early neonatal deaths, late neonatal deaths, and survival were 28.5%, 19%, 14.2%, and 38%, respectively. The perinatal mortality rate was 19% in cases with isolated congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Conclusions: The overall and perinatal mortality rate in congenital diaphragmatic hernia was still high in our series. Early perinatal deaths are associated with early diagnosis and with the presence of other structural defects. The prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities in perinatal death could not be determined from these data. In isolated congenital diaphragmatic hernia, mortality is related to the presence of herniated liver and severe pulmonary hypoplasia, this being well correlated with antenatal ultrasound parameters used for the estimation of fetal lung volumes. The antenatal diagnosis allowed better counseling of the parents, description of associations and improving the neonatal care.

Corresponding author: Luminita Cristina Chiutu, Associated Professor, MD, PhD; e-mail: luminita.chiutu@gmail.com

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ROMANIAN JOURNAL of MORPHOLOGY and EMBRYOLOGY

Raluca-Adriana Balan, George Popa, Romina Bita, Mihai Fabricky, Anca Jivanescu, Dana Cristina Bratu

Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the dental and alveolar intercanine, interpremolar and intermolar widths in patients with Class II/2 malocclusion and to compare the data with a patient group with normal occlusion and also with a patient group with Class II/1 malocclusion. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 140 untreated patients with permanent dentition, aged 16 to 25 years, which were divided into three groups, according to Angle s classification of occlusion. The measurements of the dento-alveolar intercanine, interpremolar and intermolar widths were made on virtual study models, scanned using an optical 3D scanner. The unpaired (Student s) t-test was used to determine whether there were any significant differences between the Class II/2 and Class I groups and between Class II/2 and Class II/1 groups, respectively (p<0.05). Results: Significant differences were found between Class II/2 and Class II/1 groups in the maxillary and mandibular intercanine widths. Comparing the Class II/2 and Class I groups, significant differences were found in the mandibular intercanine width, in the maxillary and mandibular interpremolar widths and also in the maxillary and mandibular intercanine and interpremolar alveolar widths. Conclusions: The maxillary and mandibular interpremolar widths and the intercanine and interpremolar alveolar widths were larger, while the mandibular intercanine width was shorter in the Class I group than in the Class II division 2 group. The mandibular intercanine width was longer and the maxillary intercanine width was shorter in the Class II division 1 group compared to the Class II division 2 group.

Corresponding author: Dana Cristina Bratu, Assistant Professor, DMD, PhD; e-mail: danacristinabratu@yahoo.com; George Popa, DMD, PhD Student; e-mail: georgepopa86@yahoo.com

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